RoSPA’s blind cord campaign is extended in Scotland

Following the success of the Make it Safe pilot campaign in North Lanarkshire, I was delighted that we secured further funding to allow us to build on the original project and roll it out to new areas in Scotland.

We launched the Make it Safe campaign at the Saltire Centre in Glenrothes on March 21 and secured a decent amount of publicity. I did a couple of radio interviews and the detail of the project was covered in the local press.

On the day I was, of course, impressed by Fife Council’s commitment at a strategic level but what was really evident on the day was the support being given by those who are actually going to be in a position to speak directly with householders.

Many different types of practitioners can offer home safety advice to support the messages that organisations like RoSPA can highlight, but the messages are much more effective when someone is standing in your house saying: “Look, this is what I’m talking about.”

The people who are supporting the campaign in Fife are well-respected by those that they visit. As well as the council’s team of home safety advisers, it’s great to have health visitors, social workers, family support workers and public health nurses standing alongside local representatives of organisations such as Gingerbread and the Scottish Childminding Association. These dedicated people are all keen to ensure that families are aware of the danger posed by corded blinds – products that are probably installed in the majority of homes.

L-R: Sam Pairman (Fife Cares), Bob Arnott (Safer Homes Task Group), Elizabeth Lumsden (RoSPA), Margaret Caldwell (Public Health Nurse), Mark McCall (Fife Community Safety Partnership)

A key part of this campaign is that we can work with local partners to ensure that advice and education is given directly to the parent or carer, and where appropriate we can actually ensure that the cleats (to tie the cords around) are fitted properly. For example the Fife Cares Child Safety Scheme will provide home safety advisers to discuss the dangers posed by blind cords with parents and carers of young children. This award-winning initiative is part of Fife’s Community Safety Partnership and also provides other child safety equipment as part of a free service.

Fife’s launch last month was also attended by Margaret Caldwell, a public health nurse whose work with the Scottish Government has resulted in an estates and facilities alert issued across the UK to highlight that corded blinds are not only an issue in the homes of the general public but could also be a danger in health care premises such as health centres and doctors’ waiting rooms. It emphasised that risk assessments should be carried out in all premises where children have access and not just kept to those that are health service-related.

We’re really pleased that the expansion of the campaign is going so well, and that people seem to be taking the advice on board.

Elizabeth Lumsden

RoSPA’s Community Safety Manager for Scotland

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: